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Immunisation Schedule

The NHS vaccination schedule

Here's a checklist of the vaccines that are routinely offered to everyone in the UK for free on the NHS, and the ages at which they should ideally be given.

Try to have your vaccinations delivered on time to ensure protection. If you're going to be away from the GP surgery when a vaccination is due, talk to your doctor. It may be possible to arrange to have the vaccination at a different location.

Routine Childhood Immunisations

If you're not sure whether you or your child have had all your routine vaccinations, ask your GP or practice nurse to find out for you. It may be possible to catch up later in life.

These are the routine vaccinations that are offered free of charge on the NHS to all babies and children in the UK.

6-in-1 vaccine

Protects against: diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, polio, Hib (Haemophilus influenzae type b) and hepatitis B.

Given at: 8, 12 and 16 weeks of age to all babies born on or after 1 August 2017.

Read more about the 6-in-1 vaccine

Pneumococcal or pneumo jab (PCV)

Protects against: some types of pneumococcal infection

Given at: 8 weeks, 16 weeks and one year of age

Read more about the pneumococcal jab

Rotavirus vaccine

Protects against: rotavirus infection, a common cause of childhood diarrhoea and sickness

Given at: 8 and 12 weeks of age

Read more about the rotavirus vaccine

Men B vaccine

Protects against: meningitis (caused by meningococcal type B bacteria)

Given at: 8 weeks, 16 weeks and one year of age

Read more about the Men B vaccine.

Hib/Men C vaccine

Protects against: Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and meningitis caused by meningococcal group C bacteria

Given at: one year of age

Read more about the Hib/Men C vaccine.

MMR vaccine

Protects against: measles, mumps and rubella

Given at: one year and at three years and four months of age

Read more about the MMR jab

Children's flu vaccine

Protects against: flu

Given at: annually as a nasal spray in Sept/Oct for all children aged two to eight years on 31 August 2017.

Read more about the flu vaccine for children

4-in-1 pre-school booster

Protects against: diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough and polio

Given at: three years and four months of age

Read more about the DTaP/IPV pre-school booster

HPV vaccine (girls only)

Protects against: cervical cancer

Given at: 12-13 years as two injections at least six months apart

Read more about the HPV vaccine

3-in-1 teenage booster

Protects against: tetanus, diphtheria and polio

Given at: 14 years

Read more about the 3-in-1 teenage booster

Men ACWY vaccine

Protects against: meningitis (caused by meningococcal types A, C, W and Y bacteria) 

Given at: 14 years and new university students aged 19-25

Read more about the Men ACWY vaccine

Pneumococcal vaccine

Protects against: pneumococcal infections e.g. pneumonia

Given at: 65 years

Read more about the Pneumococcal (PPV) vaccine

Flu vaccination

Protects against: flu

Who needs it: children aged six months to two years and those aged nine to 17 who have certain medical conditions or a weakened immune system, which may put them at risk of complications from flu. (All children aged two to eight years are given the flu vaccine as part of the routine immunisation schedule.)

Given: for children between the ages of six months and two years as a single jab every year in September/November. For children aged nine to 17 years of age as a nasal spray every year in September/November.

Read more about the nasal spray flu vaccine

Read more about the flu jab

Shingles vaccination

Protects against: shingles

Given at: 70 years (and 78 and 79 year-olds as a catchup)

Read more about the Shingles vaccine

Vaccines for special groups

There are some vaccines that aren't routinely available to everyone on the NHS, but that are available for people who fall into certain risk groups, such as vaccines for pregnant women, people with long-term health conditions, and healthcare workers.

Additional vaccines for special groups include:



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